February 2020

African Caribbean Student Association Welcome Back and General Meeting

Saturday, February 1

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Bondurant Hall 204C

This event is designed to welcome old members and new members of the association. The vision and objectives of the association and the agenda for the spring semester will be presented to members. There will be time for questions, concerns, and contributions. Food will be served, and members will have the time to socialize and get to know each other.

African Caribbean Student Association

“Lift Every Voice” Celebration

Monday, February 3

4:00 – 5:30 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – Ballroom

Join the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement for this keynote lecture and celebration of Black History! We welcome the celebration of diversity, equity, and inclusion & continue to be #AllInAllYear! The event will feature a performance from the University of Mississippi Gospel Choir, a speech from Tyler Yarbrough, and a keynote address from Dr. Patrick Elliot Alexander.

 In addition, the Lift Every Voice Award will be presented to an individual, group, or entity that has contributed to the betterment of human relationships on our campus, with particular emphasis in the areas of diversity, multiculturalism and inclusion.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“Moving Spirits: History of the Enslaved and Civil Rights through Dance and Song” Jennifer Mizenko and Rhondalyn Peairs

Monday, February 3

5:30 PM

Barnard Observatory

Do you know the stories of the enslaved persons who built the University of Mississippi buildings that you walk into on a daily basis? What is the ideology behind the symbols that are found on campus? In this SouthTalk, members of the Lafayette/Oxford/University of Mississippi community embody local history through dance and song. Jennifer Mizenko is a professor of dance at the University of Mississippi. She has a BA in psychology from Kenyon College and an MA in dance from The Ohio State University. Rhondalyn Peairs is an Oxford native, a secondary educator, and a local historian. She is a graduate of Tougaloo College and is currently enrolled in the Southern Studies MA program at the University of Mississippi. 

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Honors Spring Convocation featuring acclaimed author Kiese Laymon

Tuesday, February 4

7:00 – 8:30 PM

Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

The Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College (SMBHC) welcomes acclaimed author Kiese Laymon  to the stage for the Honors Spring Convocation. 

Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College

When They See Us: 4-Part Series Viewing & Discussion

Tuesday, February 4

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union -326

Join the CICCE as we view and discuss the 4-part, award winning, series – When They See Us.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“Fighting Prison Nation: The Nation of Islam’s Challenge to Criminalization” Garrett Felber

Wednesday, February 5

Noon – 1:00 PM

Barnard Observatory

Garrett Felber discusses his new book, Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Struggle, and the Carceral State, a definitive political history of the NOI that documents the interplay between law enforcement and Muslim communities in the postwar United States. The book illuminates new sites and forms of political struggle as Muslims prayed under surveillance in prison yards and used courtroom political theater to put the state on trial. His talk highlights familiar figures in new ways while highlighting the forgotten organizing of rank-and-file activists in prisons. Felber decisively shows how state repression and Muslim organizing laid the groundwork for the modern carceral state and the contemporary prison abolition movement that opposes it. Garrett Felber is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi. His research and teaching focus on twentieth-century African American social movements and U.S. social and political history, Black radicalism, and the carceral state.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Black Student Union 7th Annual Black History Month Gala

Friday, February 7

6:00 PM

Inn at Ole Miss

A celebration of Black achievement at the University of Mississippi. 

Black Student Union

When They See Us: 4-Part Series Viewing & Discussion

Tuesday, February 11

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union -326

Join the CICCE as we view and discuss the 4-part, award winning, series – When They See Us.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

 

QPOC (Queer People of Color) Organization Interest Meeting

Wednesday, February 12

6:00 – 7: 00 PM

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement – Ole Miss Student Union Suite F

Queer People of Color is an organization dedicated to providing a space for people of color on UM’s campus who are members of and allies to the LGBTQIA+ community. All UM undergraduate, graduate, and professional students are welcome to attend the interest meeting!

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“Advancing Each Other: Building Coalitions Across Communities” – Mandy Carter

Wednesday, February 13

11:00 – Noon

Overby Center of Southern Journalism and Politics Auditorium

Mandy Carter is a human rights activist and a legend in the LGBTQ+ community. A resident of Durham, North Carolina, she is a cofounder of Southerners on New Ground (SONG), a human rights organization devoted to uniting LGBTQ+ people in the South and to assisting poor, rural, and working-class southerners in becoming leaders in shaping the region’s future. Her talk focuses on her fifty-two years of grassroots activism. She explores how diverse communities might unite around shared goals of peace and justice. Her visit is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, School of Journalism and New Media, the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, and the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement.

School of Journalism and New Media

Black History Month Concert

Wednesday, February 13

7:30 – 9:30 PM

Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

A concert featuring UM’s Concert Singers, LOU Symphony Orchestra, UM Gospel Choir, Ole Miss African Drum and Dance Ensemble and a few soloists. Performance of works of Black composers and African American and African music genres.

Department of Music

Black Faces in White Spaces

Monday, February 17

7:00 – 8:30 PM

Location TBD

This event will be a panel discussion with black professionals in different fields navigating their predominantly white workspaces. Panelists will discuss their experiences and the challenges they face as well as provide young professionals with tools and tips on how to be successful in similar spaces as they transition into the workforce. 

Black Graduate and Professional Student Association

When They See Us: 4-Part Series Viewing & Discussion

Tuesday, February 18

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union -326

Join the CICCE as we view and discuss the 4-part, award winning, series – When They See Us.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Are You Ready? Dialogue Series: Race in the Media

Wednesday, February 19

4:00 – 5:15 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – 323

Five Myths About African Americans and the News: If you think the news runs too many stories about black troublemakers and the reason is the media are racist, think again. That’s the message from media scholar Kirk A. Johnson, who invites us to look beyond simple assumptions about how the news works. Drawing from classic scholarship and the latest research, Johnson invites us to look beyond the headlines into a world where race intersects with the news in surprising and complicated ways. Dr. Kirk A. Johnson-Professor of Sociology and African American Studies

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“‘All Our Names Were Freedom’: Agency, Resiliency, and Community in Yalobusha County” Dottie Chapman Reed, with Colton Babbitt, Michelle Bright, Brittany Brown, Keon Burns, and Rhondalyn Peairs

Wednesday, February 19

5:30 PM

Barnard Observatory

During the fall semester, five students in SST 560, Oral History of Southern Social Movements, taught by Jessie Wilkerson, collaborated with Dottie Chapman Reed to develop the Black Families of Yalobusha County Oral History Project. Reed, who lives in Atlanta, is a member of the University of Mississippi Class of ’74, grew up in Water Valley, and writes the column “Outstanding Black Women of Yalobusha County” for the North Mississippi Herald. In this SouthTalk, the students of SST 560 will present a multivocal, multilayered history based on interviews from their oral history project. Dottie Chapman Reed will speak during the Summit on Women and Civic Engagement sponsored by the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies earlier that day. 

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Black Power at Ole Miss: Remembrance, Reckoning, and Repair at Fifty Years Luncheon

Tuesday, February 25

Noon – 2:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – Ballroom

The University of Mississippi commemorates the 50th anniversary of the protests and mass arrests of Black students which took place at the University of Mississippi on February 25, 1970. Black Power at Ole Miss will remember and honor the activism and sacrifice of Black students, reckon with the harm and trauma caused by the actions of university and federal and state law enforcement, and seek reparative solutions grounded in truth-telling and justice. 

There will be a free a luncheon for current and former University of Mississippi students and alumni, sponsored by the Black Student Union, the Black Alumni Association, the African American Studies Department, and the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement as a part of the overall programming for Black Power at Ole Miss: Remembrance, Reckoning, and Repair at Fifty Years. Free tickets for faculty and staff are available now at the UM Box Office in the Ford Center. Students and alumni should complete the online registration form HERE by February 17.

Division of Diversity and Community Engagement

Black History Month Keynote Address featuring Dr. Yusef Salaam

Tuesday, February 25

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – Ballroom

Black History Month Keynote Address ft. one of “The Exonerated Five” Dr. Yusef Salaam

Tickets available at the Ole Miss Box Office

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Movement and Migration Series Lecture: “Their Own Kind of Removal: Lumbee Indians in the Antebellum South” – Malinda Maynor Lowery

Wednesday, February 26

Noon – 1:00 PM

Barnard Observatory

For the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, their long struggle has entailed working through the South’s racial binary and resisting the erasure that seemed an inevitable outcome of Indian Removal. The Lumbees persisted in an increasingly hostile environment by adapting some aspects of white culture, including apprenticeship and marriage, and by building literacy and practicing Christianity. Others participated in black market activities and met social challenges through legal channels. Their efforts provided a sense of social unity that defined their sense of belonging and defined them as a distinct community in a biracial region.

Malinda Maynor Lowery is a professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill and director of the Center for the Study of the American South. She is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. She is the author of The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Allies Training

Thursday, February 27

4:00 – 7:00 PM

Bryant Hall – 111

Allies training is a 2.5 to 3 hour workshop that aims to 1) encourage a basic understanding of LGBTQ+ definitions, concepts and terms relating to sexual orientation and gender identities, 2) introduce campus and state-level issues and concerns that impact individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bi, trans, and/or questioning/queer, and 3) model how to be an effective and informed ally to those communities.

Click to register for the 2/27/2020 training

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement