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February 2021

I’m Not a Racist, Am I? Film Viewing and Conversation with the Director and Producer

Monday, February 1

6:00 PM

Registration and Movie Link

The film is free to watch from January 29 – February 1.

The conversation with the Director and Producer will take place at 6:00 PM CST on Monday, February 1.

I’m Not Racist… Am I? is a feature documentary about how this next generation is going to confront racism. We asked 12 teenagers from New York City to come together for one school year to talk about race and privilege in a series of workshops and in conversations with friends and family members. We hope that by documenting their experience, the film will inspire others to recognize and interrupt racism in their own lives.

The film is part of a larger initiative – Deconstructing Race – developed by The Calhoun School to create a multimedia platform to get young people, their teachers and their families talking – and doing something – about structural systemic racism.

This free event is brought to you by Mississippi Humanities Council and in partnership with Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement. 

Oxford Film Festival and Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement.

Spring 2021 Pride Camp with DoctorJonPaul

Tuesday, February 2

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Pride Camp is an event focused on community learning and building for LGBTQIA+ persons and their allies. Registration is required, but all students, faculty, staff, and community members are welcome to attend. You do not have to have attended any previous Pride Camps to participate.

This Spring 2021 Pride Camp will feature both a workshop and a dialogue event with professor, national speaker, freelance journalist, thought leader and media critic Dr. Jonathan P. Higgins (DoctorJonPaul).

Named Business Equality Magazine’s “Top 40 LGBTQ People Under 40”, DoctorJonPaul’s work has been featured on sites like NBC News, Vox, VICE, MTV News, Essence, Out Magazine, TedX and more. They have worked on several inclusion projects with top brands like Apple, Disney, Instagram and the NFL and currently teach about diversity and inclusion at the University of Redlands. They hold a doctorate in educational justice and often write and lecture about what liberation means for queer Black people and how we can help them not just survive, but thrive.

Registration form – Registration required to receive Zoom link.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Dialogues on Diversity with DoctorJonPaul

Tuesday, February 2

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

The University of Mississippi Dialogues on Diversity is a new initiative fostering institutional change through civil discourse. This event will feature speaker DoctorJonPaul, as a continuation of their virtual visit for Pride Camp 2.0, and is open to all members of campus and the community.

Registration form – Registration required to receive Zoom link.

Center for Inclusion & Cross Cultural Engagement and Division of Diversity & Community Engagement

Black History Month Keynote Address featuring Dr. Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

Tuesday, February 9

5:00 PM

Black History Month Keynote Address: Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America & Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own 

Dr. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is an intellectual who speaks to the complex dynamics of the American experience. His most well-known books, Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America, take a wide look at black communities, the difficulties of race in the United States, and the challenges our democracy face. He is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor and chair of the Department of African American Studies. He is the former president of the American Academy of Religion. His books on religion and philosophy include An Uncommon Faith: A Pragmatic Approach to the Study of African American Religion, African American Religion: A Very Short Introduction and Exodus! Religion, Race and Nation in Early 19th Century Black America. He has also written for the likes of The New York Times and Time Magazine

Registration form – Registration required to receive Zoom link.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Southern Journey: The Migrations of the American South, 1790-2020

Wednesday, February 10

12:00 PM

Registration form – Registration RequiredIn his talk “Southern Journey,” Edward L. Ayers narrates the evolution of southern history from the founding of the nation to the present day by focusing on the settling, unsettling, and resettling of the South. Ayers explains the major contours and events of the southern past from a fresh perspective, weaving geography with history in innovative ways. He uses unique color maps created with sophisticated tools to interpret massive data sets from a humanistic perspective, providing a view of movement within the South with a clarity, detail, and continuity we have not seen before. The South has never stood still; it is—and always has been—changing in deep, radical, sometimes contradictory ways, often in divergent directions. Ayers will be in conversation with Ted Ownby, professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

Registration form – Registration Required

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Protests in Pro Football, 1965-2020 with Chuck Ross 

Thursday, February 11 

3:00 PM

Chuck Ross’s “Protests in Pro Football, 1965–2020” talk examines both the events leading up to the 1965 American Football League All-Star game protest and the events that led to Colin Kapernick’s 2016 NFL protest. Ross will also discuss the legacy of Kapernick’s actions in the wake of the death of George Floyd and the different responses by professional sports leagues and teams in America.

Registration form – Registration Required

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems with Frank X Walker 

Wednesday, February 17

12:00 PM

Frank X Walker will read from and discuss his latest collection of poems, Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems. The poems document in real time the myriad of challenges presented by the multiple pandemics of Covid-19 and racial injustice. They also offer edifying pockets of solace as the poet shares his family’s survival tips, strategies, and discoveries in midst of so much loss, while properly laying blame at the feet of the administration that unnecessarily politicized, misled, and further complicated this country’s response to the virus. University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies Derrick Harriell will facilitate the Q&A portion of this event. 

Registration form – Registration Required

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

 Are You Ready? Dialogue Series 

Wednesday, February 17 

5:00 PM

The AYR dialogues series seeks to provide space for participants to learn about challenging topics, listen to fellow campus community members share their perspectives and knowledge, and take away skills and practices they can implement for themselves and within their communities at the University of Mississippi and beyond.

Registration form – Registration required to receive Zoom link.

Center for Inclusion & Cross Cultural Engagement

SarahTalk

Thursday, February 18

4:00 PM

Dr. Shennette Garrett-Scott, associate professor of History and African American Studies, will discuss the life and impact of Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze in our first Sarahtalk of the semester.

About Mary Cordelia Montgomery Booze: Born Mary Montgomery in March 1878 to parents who had been enslaved when young, she grew up in the Mississippi Delta. Her father, Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924), was a cotton producer politically allied with the famous Republican educator Booker T. Washington. In 1887, the Montgomerys moved to Bolivar County south of Clarksdale in the rich delta country of northwestern Mississippi. There Montgomery founded an all-black agricultural community, Mound Bayou, located along the Mississippi River. Mary was educated locally before going to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she studied for two years at the historically black Straight University. She returned to Mound Bayou and worked as a bookkeeper in the family business. She also taught at the teacher-training Mound Bayou Normal Institute.

Despite state restrictions that effectively disenfranchised most blacks, Booze joined the Republican Party. Beginning in 1924, she served as a committeewoman from Mississippi to the Republican National Committee, the first African-American woman to hold that position.

Registration Form – Registration Required

Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

Film Showing: Lil Buck Real Swan

Friday, February 19

7:00 PM

Drive-In at 100 Thacker Loop, Oxford MS 38655

Dancer Lil’ Buck grew up jookin and bucking on the streets of Memphis. After a breathtaking video of him dancing to Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Swan” accompanied by cellist Yo-Yo Ma went viral, everything changed.

$10 per car: Tickets

Oxford Film Festival

The Emmett Till Generation: Youth Activism, Radical Protest, and Social Change in Jim Crow Mississippi with Daphne Chamberlain

Wednesday, February 24

12:00 PM

Daphne Chamberlain’s talk highlights the role of children as leaders and participants in the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1946 and 1965. This presentation also offers a new perspective on the origins of the civil rights struggle and gives credence to how instrumental young people were to engaging in radical protest and grassroots activism in Mississippi.

Registration form – Registration Required

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Art Talks: Margaret Vendryes – African Diva Project 

Wednesday, February 24

5:00 PM

New York City-baed painter/educator Margaret Vendryes will discuss her African Diva Project, which seeks to connect representations of Black female entertainers’ bodies back to their African heritage. A link to the project: https://www.mrvendryes.com/

Registration Link

Department of Art & Art History

Allies Training

Wednesday, February 24

5:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Allies Training is a Diversity Education Workshop that aims to encourage foundational understanding of sexual orientation and gender identity. Participants will be introduced to past and current issues and concerns that impact LGBTQIA+ individuals, as well as models on being effective and informed allies to the LGBTQIA+ community. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to register and attend.

Registration form – Registration required to receive Zoom link.

Center for Inclusion & Cross Cultural Engagement

Black Power at Ole Miss Task Force Presentation 

Thursday, February 25

3:00 PM

Led by Black Power at Ole Miss Task Force co-chairs Dr. Donald Cole, Dr. Katie McKee, and Dr. Shawnboda Mead, this is an opportunity to learn about the ongoing efforts and progress of the taskforce. This event is open to reunion participants, their guests, and current UM students, faculty, and staff.

Student Registration

Division of Diversity & Community Engagement

Dialogues on Diversity “NATIONWIDE NOW: Protests in Higher Education”

Thursday, February 25

5:00 PM

A film screening of the student-produced documentary “Black Power at Ole Miss” followed by an intergenerational panel discussion with student activists from the 1970s and more recent decades and years

Student Registration

Division of Diversity & Community Engagement

The Living Wax Museum

Living Wax Museum

Circle written inside living wax museum

Thursday, February 25

YouTube Video Release – 6:00 PM 

The Living Wax Museum has moved to virtual participation. This event encourages diverse forms of art expression. Participants can embody prevalent figures in the Black community or display their truth and showcase any form of art to highlight History. The participants can do a monologue, speech, poetry, paint, sing, dance or any form of art. If you are interested in submitting a video of your performance, please email Veronne Clark at vjclark@olemiss.edu for more details. All videos are due Wednesday, Feb 24 by 5:00pm.

Examples of Performances:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJBo9jdUJiY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YshUDa10JYY

Ole Miss Athletics

Black Power at Ole Miss Lasting Impact Mixer 

Thursday, February 25

6:30 PM

Mixer event for affected students from 1970 and current UM students with a focus on the lasting impact of the 1970 protest. Led by current Black Student Union President Nicholas Crasta and current Associated Student Body President Joshua Mannery. This event is open to reunion participants, their guests, and current UM students, not faculty and staff.

Student Registration

Division of Diversity & Community Engagement

Black History Month Concert

Thursday, February 25

7:30 PM

Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts

Performers include guest artist, Ms. Doreen Ketchens, an African American female virtuoso clarinetist and a jazz band director from New Orleans; the UM Mississippians Jazz Ensemble; and Ole Miss African Drum and Dance Ensemble (OMADDE)

Department of Music

Black Student Union’s Eighth Annual Black History Month Gala, 2021

Friday, February 26

6:30 PM

The Inn at Ole Miss – University of Mississippi

For more information, contact the Black Student Union at bsu@go.olemiss.edu

*COVID-19 Procedures Strictly Enforced*

Black Student Union

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