March 2020

Movement and Migration Series Lecture: “Racist Kitsch for the Twenty-First Century? Anthropomorphic Asians, Kawaii-style, and the Culture of Cute”

Wednesday, March 4

Noon – 1:00 PM

Barnard Observatory

We understand the harm embodied by mammy cookie jars, minstrel coin banks, and any number of household items depicting African Americans during the Jim Crow era, yet these demeaning anthropomorphic objects have found new iterations in the twenty-first century: the global circulation of the Asian figure as saltshaker, kitchen timer, and decor. How is it that such commodities manage to circumvent taboos surrounding ethnic caricature that now surround their infamous progenitors in the US South? How do these new forms of racial kitsch evade contextualization as racist kitsch?

In part, the answer lies in the rise of the Japanese style known as kawaii or “cute style” since the 1970s, an aesthetic form that has specific resonance for Asian racialization. This talk explores the racial feelings that the “cute” enables and draws upon narratives of African American collectors of black memorabilia to engage Asian Americans’ ambivalent relationship to racialized kawaii things.

Leslie Bow is Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Skrontch Music

Wednesday, March 4

7:30 PM

Nutt Auditorium

Skrontch Music is project led by saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer Byron Asher that explores the histories and lineages of jazz in the South through contemporary soundscapes. Featuring a ten-piece New Orleans-based ensemble, Skrontch Music’s debut album incorporates elements of sound collage and text from primary source documents to address the intertwined histories of the formation of New Orleans jazz and anti–Jim Crow activism. The ensemble will present material that uses similar techniques to investigate the blues and the radically political and musical themes that are embedded within them. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and the Department of Music.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Movement and Migration Series Lecture: “From Latino Orlando to International Memphis: Migration and Transformation in the American South”

Wednesday, March 18

Noon – 1:00 PM

Barnard Observatory

In this SouthTalk, Simone Delerme will share her ethnographic research that documents the ways that southern places are being transformed by an influx of migrants, primarily Latino. How are these newcomers incorporated into the social, political, and economic life of communities that were nontraditional destinations of migration, and how are they challenging the South’s historic black-white racial binary?

Simone Delerme joined the University of Mississippi’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology and Center for the Study of Southern Culture in the fall of 2013. She specializes in migration to the US South, with interests in race relations, integration and incorporation, community development, and social class inequalities.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Visiting Documentarian Series: Always in Season Jacqueline Olive 

Wednesday, March 18

5:00 PM

Overby Center For Southern Journalism & Politics Auditorium

Jacqueline Olive is an independent filmmaker and immersive media producer with fifteen years of experience in journalism and film. Always in Season, her debut feature documentary, explores the lingering impact of more than a century of lynching and connects this form of racial terrorism with racial violence today. The film follows Claudia Lacy as she moves from paralyzing grief to leading the fight for justice for her son, Lennon Lacy, who was found hanging from a swing set in rural North Carolina in 2014. As the film unfolds, Lennon’s case—and the suspicions surrounding it—intersect with stories of other communities committed to breaking the silence of their own recent histories and leading the way to justice. This event is cosponsored by the Oxford Film Festival, March 18–22.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Africa and The Caribbean Through Music

Thursday, March 19

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Location: TBA

There will be a presentation to show the audience the rich and diverse cultural heritage of Africa and the Caribbean music and dance. This diversity is not only in the area of the genre but also in terms of the functional role music play in Africa/Caribbean society such as marriage ceremony, birthday celebration, rites of passage, hunting, and even political activities

African and Caribbean Student Association

The In-Between

Friday, March 20 at 9:30 AM

Sunday, March 22 at 12:15 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Two women set out on a road trip with different missions. Mads (Jennifer Stone “Wizards of Waverly Place”) needs to renew her driver’s license in South Dakota, while Junior needs to visit Portland, OR on a quest for her dead sister. Both women have medical issues that cause friction along the way, but they never let those problems define their identities.

Sponsoring Organization: Oxford Film Festival

Narrative Shorts: Hello Gorgeous

Friday, March 20

12:30 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Sponsoring Organization: Oxford Film Festival

Queen of Lapa

Friday, March 20

2:30 PM

Larger-than-life actress, cabaret performer, activist, and proud sex professional since the age of eleven, Luana Muniz – arguably one of Brazil’s most recognizable transgender personalities, shapes a new reality for a new generation of transgender sex workers in her hostel by providing a safe working environment in the dangerous neighborhood of Lapa in Rio de Janeiro. Queen of Lapa explores the day-to-day lives, quests for love, housemate rivalries in a turbulent political climate under matriarch Muniz’s watchful and guiding eye. 

Sponsoring Organization: Oxford Film Festival

Narrative Shorts: Black Lens

Friday, March 20

3:00 – 5:00 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Short films that look at Black life in America.

Oxford Film Festival

 The Evers

Friday, March 20

4:45 – 6:45 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

On June 12, 1963, an assassin’s bullet ended the life of Medgar Evers, the Field Secretary of the NAACP in Mississippi. From the Emmy-winning director of “The Uncomfortable Truth” comes the incredible true story of one family’s unbreakable love and tragic sacrifice in the name of freedom for everyone. “The Evers” is a powerful testament of love, faith and family in the quest for a better world.

Oxford Film Festival

The Long Shadow

Friday, March 20

5:00 – 7:00 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

A young Sheriff’s Deputy takes on her Louisiana town’s old-money establishment when the woman she loves — an attorney fighting a rail deal that will displace the poor — is found murdered.

Oxford Film Festival

The Killing of Kenneth Chamberlain

Friday, March 20

7:15 – 9:15 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Based on the true story of the events that led to the death of Kenneth Chamberlain Sr., an elderly African American veteran with bipolar disorder, who was killed during a conflict with police officers who were dispatched to check on him.

Oxford Film Festival

A Dim Valley

Friday, March 20

7:30pm

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

A curmudgeonly biologist and his slacker graduate assistants muddle their way through a summer research project. Deep in the Appalachian woods, they encounter a trio of mystical backpackers who change their lives in mysterious ways.

Oxford Film Festival

Reckoning

Saturday, March 21

9:30 AM and 1:45 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

After the disappearance of her husband, a struggling farmer in an isolated Appalachian community discovers she is a pawn in a blood-soaked revenge plot and the only way out for her and her son could mean destroying a decades-old truce.

Sponsoring Organization: Oxford Film Festival

Our Bodies Our Doctors

Saturday, March 21

1:45 – 3:45 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Nearly 1 in 4 American women have an abortion during their lifetime, yet the doctors who perform this commonplace procedure are rarely talked about or seen. “Our Bodies Our Doctors” follows these quiet heroes behind the scenes and into the procedure room, showing their strength and compassion for women. It’s a journey into their world, why they do this work, and how they resist the threats, violence and intensified political efforts to criminalize abortion. 

Oxford Film Festival

 Once Upon a River and Nowhere Arkansas

Saturday, March 21 at 6:45 PM and Sunday, March 22 at 9:45 AM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Based on the best-selling novel by Bonnie Jo Campbell, Once Upon A River is the story of Native American teenager Margo Crane in 1970s rural Michigan. After enduring a series of traumas and tragedies, Margo (newcomer Kenadi DelaCerna) sets out on an odyssey on the Stark River in search of her estranged mother. On the water, Margo encounters friends, foes, wonders, and dangers; navigating life on her own, she comes to understand her potential, all while healing the wounds of her past.

Nowhere, Arkansas, 1863. A Confederate veteran, haunted by his past, hunts redemption in the form of a famous eagle that belongs to the Union Army.

Sponsoring Organization: Oxford Film Festival

Conversation with Author Angie Thomas

Saturday, March 21

7:45 – 9:00 PM

Malco Oxford Commons Cinema

Angie Thomas was born, raised, and still lives in Jackson, Mississippi. A former teen rapper, she holds a BFA in creative writing from Belhaven University. Her award-winning, acclaimed debut novel, The Hate U Give, is a #1 New York Times bestseller and major motion picture from Fox 2000, starring Amandla Stenberg and directed by George Tillman, Jr. Her second novel, On the Come Up, is on sale now.

Oxford Film Festival

“‘Do you know what it means?’ New Orleans Englishes” – Christina Schoux Casey

Wednesday, March 25

Noon – 1:00 PM

Barnard Observatory

Christina Schoux Casey is associate professor of English linguistics at Aalborg University, Denmark. Her research focuses on New Orleans Englishes and how language intersects with cultural commodification, neoliberal globalization, authenticity, and nostalgia. In her SouthTalk, Casey will discuss New Orleans language, from Who Dat! to bounce music to Vietnamese and French.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Are You Ready? Dialogue Series: Moving Spirits: History of Slavery and Civil Rights Through Movement, Dance, and Song

Thursday, March 26

6:00 – 7:00 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – 323

We walk past history in plain site, on a daily basis. Do you know the stories of the enslaved persons who built the buildings you walk into on a daily basis? What is the ideology behind the symbols we walk by every day? Witness the process of members of the Lafayette/Oxford/University of Mississippi community not only learn their local history, but also literally embody it.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Sister2Sister Leadership Retreat

Friday, March 27

3:00 – 8:00 PM

Lamar Hall

In partnership with various departments and student organizations, the Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement will host the 5th annual Sister2Sister Leadership Retreat on March 27, 2020. The retreat will address issues that impact Women of Color on campus and in the local community while also highlighting the benefits and challenges associated with attending an institution of higher education. The mission is to provide a forum for engaging and interactive discussions regarding personal, social, and academic responsibility while attending the University of Mississippi.

Click to Register

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Women’s Empowerment Keynote Address & Awards featuring Alysia Harris

Tuesday, March 31

6:00 – 7:30 PM

Ole Miss Student Union – Ballroom

Tickets available at the Ole Miss Box Office

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement