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September 2021

Native American Student Community Gathering

Wednesday, September 1

5:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, Gertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union

A welcome event for Native American students at the University of Mississippi. We seek for this space to be a time to meet other Native American students at the University, build community, and discuss future opportunities. 

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country: The Benton County Civil Rights Movement with Roy DeBerry

Wednesday, September 8

Noon

Virtual Event – https://southernstudies.olemiss.edu/

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country is a collection of interviews with residents of Benton County, Mississippi—an area with a long and fascinating civil rights history. The product of more than twenty-five years of work by the Hill Country Project, the book examines a revolutionary period in American history through the voices of farmers, teachers, sharecroppers, and students. No other rural farming county in the American South has yet been afforded such a deep dive into its civil rights experiences and their legacies. These accumulated stories truly capture life before, during, and after the movement.

In this SouthTalk, coauthor of Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country Roy DeBerry will discuss the region’s history and the everyday struggles of African American residents of Benton County, who had been organizing since the 1930s.

Roy DeBerry is executive director of the Hill Country Project. He recently retired as vice president for economic development and local governmental affairs at Jackson State University, where he also served as executive vice president and vice president of external relations.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 

Sarahtalk: “‘Where the Girls Are:’ Riot Grrrl, Feminism, and Queer 1990s Culture”

Thursday, September 9

4 p.m.

Virtual: Register at this link

Dr. Cookie Woolner Assistant Professor of History at the University of Memphis, will deliver the first Sarahtalk of the fall semester. Her talk will focus on the intersection of music, feminism, and queer culture in the 1990’s. Admission is free and open to the public.

Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

Guaranteed 4.0 Workshop

Thursday, September 9

5:30 p.m. 

Gertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Auditorium 124

Workshop on how to get a 4.0 during your tenure in college. Event only for IMAGE and NSBE Organizations, food will be provided.

LSMAMP/IMAGE Program, NSBE – School of Engineering 

Mississippi Creates: Annemarie Anderson, Kelly Spivey, and Schaefer Llana

Friday, September 10

Doors @ 7:30 p.m. and starts at 8:00 p.m.

Location: The Powerhouse (413 S. 14 St.)

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture and Yoknapatawpha Arts Council partner for the premiere of Mississippi Creates, an event that pairs musical performance with short documentary films, providing a glimpse into the creative life and environments of two local musicians: Tyler Keith and Schaefer Llana. This pair of films is part of a larger series that highlights artists and performers who have been influenced or inspired by the culture and sounds of Mississippi. The screening includes a live musical performance by Schaefer Llana and will be followed by a brief Q&A with the musician and film directors Annemarie Anderson and Kelly Spivey. This event is free to the public and open to all ages.

Annemarie Anderson is the oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance. She manages and conducts oral history work throughout the South. 

At age ten Schaefer Llana moved from St. Louis, Missouri, to Batesville, Mississippi, where she learned to play piano and guitar.

Kelly Spivey is a documentarian living and working in Memphis, Tennessee. She holds a BFA in photography from SCAD, and both an MA in Southern Studies and an MFA in Documentary Expression from the University of Mississippi.

Mississippi Creates is made possible by Cathead, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and the Mississippi Humanities Council.

Living Music Resource LIVE : “Voices of Mississippi” – featuring William Ferris, Shardé Thomas, Scott Barretta, and LMR Live host Nancy Maria Balach

Monday, September 13

1 – 2 p.m.

Location and Format TBA – for event updates https://southernstudies.olemiss.edu/

Join Living Music Resource for a lively discussion and interactive experience with artists featured in the September 14 “Voices of Mississippi” concert — demonstrating the range of talent and people who make up our state. Free admission

Center for the Study of Southern Culture, Living Music Resource, Department of Music, Mississippi Humanities Council

Hispanic  & Latinx Student Community Gathering

Monday, September 13

5:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, Gertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union

A welcome event for Hispanic & Latinx students at the University of Mississippi. We seek for this space to be a time to meet other Hispanic & Latinx students at the University, build community, and discuss future opportunities. 

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Language and Gender: How Do You Say That?

Tuesday, September 14 

3:00 p.m.

LGBTQ Lounge, Lamar Hall – 4th Floor

In this program we will watch a Youtube video titled “Elles: Being Non-Binary and Latinx” and another video on the use of non-binary pronouns. As a group we will then discuss how language helps us find our place and feel most comfortable inside and outside of the community. 

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“Voices of Mississippi” Concert 

Tuesday, September 14 – 7:30 p.m.

Location: Gertrude C. Ford Center for Performing Arts

Voices of Mississippi is a new multimedia event that celebrates the music, art, and storytelling traditions of the people of Mississippi. The traveling live show will come to the University of Mississippi’s Ford Center for the Performing Arts on at 7:30 on Tuesday, September 14, 2021.

Based on the 2019 double-Grammy Award–winning Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris boxed set, the live program features musical performances integrated with film, audio recordings, and rare photographs captured by folklorist William Ferris, who will serve as host for the evening. The show will feature musicians Shardé Thomas, Cedric Burnside, and Luther and Cody Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars, all of whom are descendants of artists documented by Ferris.

A historian with a proudly egalitarian lens, Ferris studied Mississippi as a place where everyone and everything was interconnected—and in which the beating heart of broader cultural traditions could be found in some of the most overlooked figures and places. From the 1960s through the 1990s, Ferris captured an invaluable archive of cultural and musical treasures, and much of that art and humanity will be shared in this unique concert experience.

With a broad array of photos, film clips, stories and live music, Voices of Mississippi paints a powerful picture of a unique time and place that remains an essential piece of the American cultural fabric.

Born in Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1942, William Ferris grew up on a working farm and was always fascinated by the southern folklore and culture that surrounded him. At a young age he began documenting the artwork, music, and lives of the people on the farm and in his local community. Earning a PhD in folklore from the University of Pennsylvania in 1969, Ferris then taught at Jackson State University (1970–72), Yale University (1972–79), the University of Mississippi (1979–97), and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2002–18). In addition to his teaching, Ferris also cofounded the Center for Southern Folklore in Memphis, was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, and was chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1997 to 2001.

Cedric Burnside is a twice-Grammy nominated blues drummer, guitarist, singer, and songwriter. The son of blues drummer Calvin Jackson and grandson of blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist R. L. Burnside, Cedric proudly carries the legacy of the Mississippi Hill Country blues tradition, as well as its future, melding modern elements from rock to funk to soul into the deep, unmistakable grooves that have shaped the blues of the Hill Country.

Shardé Thomas was born in North Mississippi and is the granddaughter of the late Othar Turner, the legendary fife player who kept the fife and drum tradition alive. Shardé was her grandfather’s musical heir at a very young age and today is the lead vocalist and fife player in the Rising Stars Fife and Drum Band. After Othar passed away, Shardé took over the band, which now performs a mixture of blues, pop, hip-hop, gospel, and folk music.

A gifted guitarist with an eclectic range of influences, Luther Dickinson has earned a reputation as an innovator in modern blues while also having a keen understanding and respect for its rich history. Whether co-leading the Grammy-nominated North Mississippi Allstars band with his drummer brother Cody, recording and performing solo, or collaborating with regional artists, his devotion to and experiments with roots sounds from the American South is total.

Perhaps best known as the drummer and a founding member of the North Mississippi Allstars band, Cody earned three Grammy nominations as a member of the band. He has also personally garnered a Blues Music Awards nomination in the Best Instrumentalist/Drums category and was coproducer of the film Take Me to the River. For more information visit this site https://fordcenter.org/event/voices-of-mississippi/

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 

Wellness Walk Series

Wednesday, September 15

Noon

Grove Stage

The William Magee Center is launching the Wellness Walk Series in Fall 2021 to encourage our campus community to embrace and maintain their physical wellbeing while highlighting its interconnectedness to the other dimensions of wellness. Our office envisions students, staff, faculty, and community members walking together along the University’s designated walking paths.

William Magee Center

Okla Humma: I Maya Moma Hoki (The Honorable People: We Have Remained in This Place) by Tammy Greer

Wednesday, September 15 – noon

Virtual Event – Register on at https://southernstudies.olemiss.edu/ 

As a member of the United Houma Nation and director of the Center for American Indian Research and Studies (CAIRS) at the University of Southern Mississippi, Tammy Greer has worked with Southeastern Native tribal members on numerous projects, including the formation of CAIRS and the building of a one thousand-square-foot Medicine Wheel garden on the USM campus. She is the faculty advisor for the Golden Eagles Intertribal Society, a Native focused student group on campus who, along with CAIRS, tends the garden, hosts a yearly powwow, and organizes two Native Ways School Day events each year. Greer is currently working with the Mississippi INBRE Telenutrition Center to recruit Native students from Mississippi and Louisiana to engage in a summer program in health disparities research. The focus of her Okla Achukma project is to address preventable chronic diseases in our Southeastern Native tribes in a more holistic way using the traditional teachings of the sacred Medicine Wheel.

In this SouthTalk, Greer will discuss how Medicine Wheel teachings can lead us to a more inclusive, more holistic way of being with one another and with all beings on earth

Center for the Study of Southern Culture

IDEAS FORUM: The Mississippi Chinese

Wednesday, September 15 – 4pm

Register via this link: https://libarts.olemiss.edu/bamboo-and-cotton-the-mississippi-chinese/

Location: Virtual Event

Bamboo and Cotton: The Mississippi Chinese: A common perception of Mississippi, especially the Mississippi Delta, is of a place lacking in diversity and culture. However, when one looks more deeply, there are populations of diverse people who have carved out spaces for themselves within this southern landscape. One such people are the Mississippi Delta Chinese and how their story is woven into the fabric of Mississippi.   

College of Liberal Arts

WE Listen Board

Thursday, September 16 – 11am

Union Plaza

This will be an opportunity for individuals to reflect on their current mental state by sharing their status anonymously on a large board using pre-made buttons. The UM Community will be able to see the current mental state of those around them. Our goal is to reduce stigma around seeking help regarding mental health.

William Magee Center

The Longest Table

Event has been Postponed

The Walk of Champions in The Grove

The Longest Table is UM’s “family table”, and our greatest asset is the rich diversity of people, experiences, skills, and perspectives that form the fabric of our university. The Longest Table creates a time, place, and format to better capture the value of these assets and envision an even stronger university. Join other students, faculty, and staff in shaping a more vibrant community by taking you seat at the Longest Table. 

The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement

 “I Rode to Rome at Night’: The Ancient Mediterranean World in the Early Writings of W. E. B. Du Bois.” with Mathias Hanses

Monday, September 20

5:30 p.m. 

Bryant Hall – 209

Mathias Hanses of Pennsylvania State University has published several studies of pioneer sociologist, author, and civil rights activist W.E.B. DuBois’ deep and complex engagement with race and the field of Classics.

Department of Classics

Marsalis Moments of Mindfulness

Tuesday, September 21

Noon

South Campus Recreation Center – Marsalis Atrium

Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us. Moments of Mindfulness will be performative acts accompanied by guided meditative practices designed to help us achieve this goal.

William Magee Center

GILDER JORDAN LECTURE: “The Price of the Ticket: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion” by Deborah Gray White  

Tuesday, September 21 – 5:30 p.m. CDT

Virtual Lecture – You can register here

Many colleges and universities have added “diversity and inclusion” to their mission statements in recent years, but these goals have financial and emotional costs and are not achieved without intentional and thoughtful effort to dismantle the structures that perpetuate exclusion and homogeneity. Rutgers University began this process in 2015 by delving into its history and exploring how and why the structures that excluded African Americans for more than two hundred years were created. For this year’s Gilder-Jordan Lecture in Southern Cultural History, Rutgers history professor Deborah Gray White will talk about that history and the price Rutgers paid, and is paying, to make the diversity that it advertises a reality.

The title of White’s lecture is “The Price of the Ticket: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion,” which she will deliver on the evening of Tuesday, September 21. This will be a virtual, online event. 

Along with delivering the Gilder-Jordan Lecture, White will meet online with graduate students from across the UM campus to discuss her work with the Rutgers students who researched and wrote most of the essays published in Rutgers’ Scarlet and Black university history. Her discussion with graduate students will cover the value of this kind of research, including the benefits of researching outside of one’s field of expertise, doing collaborative work, entering the job market with published material, and learning the ins and outs of academic publishing.

Deborah Gray White is Board of Governors Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. She is a specialist in the history of African American women. Author of Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South and Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894–1994, White is also editor of Telling Histories: Black Women in the Ivory Tower, a collection of personal narratives written by African American women historians that chronicle the entry of black women into the historical profession and the development of the field of Black women’s history. She currently codirects the “Scarlet and Black Project,” which investigates American Indians and African Americans in the history of Rutgers University.

Organized through the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the African American studies program, Center for Civil War Research, and the Department of History, the Gilder-Jordan Speaker Series is made possible through the generosity of the Gilder Foundation, Inc. The series honors the late Richard Gilder of New York and his family, as well as University of Mississippi alumni Dan and Lou Jordan of Virginia.

Visit the Center for the Study of Southern Culture’s website for upcoming information on how to access the 2021 Gilder-Jordan Lecture in Southern Cultural History.

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 

Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities

Stephen Monroe and LaToya Faulk

Wednesday, September 22

Noon

Virtual Conversation – Register @https://southernstudies.olemiss.edu/

In this SouthTalk, Stephen Monroe and LaToya Faulk will discuss Monroe’s new book, Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities, which traces the ongoing rhetorical power of Old South words and symbols at southern universities.

Stephen Monroe is chair and assistant Professor in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Mississippi, where he is an affiliated faculty member in the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, a steering committee member for the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, and director of the Willie Morris Awards for Southern Writing. His book, Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities, was published in June as part of the Rhetoric, Culture, and Social Critique series from the University of Alabama Press.

LaToya Faulk has a BA in English literature and an MA in rhetoric and writing from Michigan State University. She teaches in the Department of Writing Rhetoric and is also a MFA fiction student at the University of Mississippi. Her work has been published in Scalawag, Southwest Review, Amherst College’s the Common, and Splinter Magazine’s Think Local series. 

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 

Isom Fellows Poster Session

Wednesday, September 22

3 p.m.

Butler Auditorium, Triplett Alumni Center

The 2019-2021 cohorts of Isom Fellows will be giving updates and discussing their research projects that explore the intersectionality of gender, sexuality, and their individual fields of study including education, criminal justice, law, literature, psychology, and more. 

Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, Office of the Provost

Reclaim the RedZone

Wednesday, September 22

7 p.m.

Pavillion Plaza

A substance-free, late-night event for students to attend in order to learn how to socialize safely while also having a good time. There would be games, food, and music along with sexual wellness learning opportunities regarding consent and sexual violence services available on and off-campus.

William Magee Center, CICCE, FSL, Housing, VIP Services, UMatter, Title IX, UPD, OPD, Counseling Center, Athletics

Out of the Darkness Walk

September 25

11 a.m.

Grove Stage

This walk will focus on suicide awareness while memorializing those that have lost their lives to suicide.

William Magee Center, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Hispanic & Latinx Heritage Month and LGBTQ+ History Month Celebration: Featuring Gabby Rivera: Inspiring Radical Creativity Empowering Young, Diverse Voices to Tell Their Own Stories

Monday, September 27

6:30 p.m.

Gertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – Auditorium 124

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Wellness Walk Series

Wednesday, September 29

Noon

Grove Stage

The William Magee Center is launching the Wellness Walk Series in Fall 2021 to encourage our campus community to embrace and maintain their physical wellbeing while highlighting its interconnectedness to the other dimensions of wellness. Our office envisions students, staff, faculty, and community members walking together along the University’s designated walking paths.

William Magee Center

See Us Differently

Wednesday, September 29

4 p.m.

Powerhouse Community Arts Center

See Us Differently will feature the creative works and writings by Common Good Atlanta (CGA) alumni. CGA is a nonprofit that takes the humanities into the prison system by providing college courses to the incarcerated (and formerly incarcerated). The panel discussion will include CGA alumni and organizers and participants in the University’s Prison-to-College Pipeline Program. 

Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, and Yoknapatawpha Arts Council

Are You Ready? Dialogue Series

Wednesday, September 29 – 6:15pm

Gertrude C. Ford Ole Miss Student Union – 321

The AYR dialogues series seeks to provide space for participants to learn about challenging topics, listen to fellow campus community members share their perspectives and knowledge, and take away skills and practices they can implement for themselves and within their communities at the University of Mississippi and beyond.

Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

“The Land of Open Graves: Understanding the Current Politics of Migrant Life and Death along the US/Mexico Border” by Jason De Léon

Thursday, September 30

4 p.m.

Location: David H. Nutt Auditorium (542 University Ave.) 

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 

 Since the mid-1990s, the US federal government has relied on a border enforcement strategy known as Prevention through Deterrence. Using various security infrastructure and techniques of surveillance, this strategy funnels undocumented migrants toward remote and rugged terrain such as the Sonoran Desert of Arizona with the hope that mountain ranges, extreme temperatures, and other natural obstacles will deter people from unauthorized entry. Hundreds of people perish annually while undertaking this dangerous activity. Since 2009, the Undocumented Migration Project has used a combination of forensic, archaeological, and ethnographic approaches to understand the various forms of violence that characterize the social process of clandestine migration. On Thursday, September 30, at 4:00 p.m., Jason De León will present a lecture that focuses on what happens to the bodies of migrants who die in the desert. He argues that the way that bodies decompose in this environment is a form of hidden political violence that has deep ideological roots, and he demonstrates how the postmortem destruction of migrant corpses creates devastating forms of long-lasting trauma. 

Jason De León is a professor of anthropology and Chicana, Chicano, and Central American studies at UCLA. He is executive director of the Undocumented Migration Project, a research-arts-education collective that seeks to document and raise awareness about the experiences of clandestine migrants, and president of the board of directors for the Colibri Center for Human Rights, a nonprofit organization that seeks to identify and repatriate the remains of people who have died while migrating through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. De León is the author of the award-winning book The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail and is a 2017 MacArthur Fellow. 

This lecture is part of the Movement and Migration/Future of the South Initiative, launched by Simone Delerme in 2019. An accompanying exhibit, Hostile Terrain, will be on display in Lamar Hall beginning on October 15. This lecture is tentatively taking place in-person at the Nutt Auditorium on the University of Mississippi campus. Please visit the Center website for any updates to the location or format. 

De León’s visit to the UM campus is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Honors College, the Center for Population Studies, the McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement, the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement, and the Croft Institute for International Studies.

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